Guiding Star

The Isle of Tiree is about 45 minutes flying time from Glasgow.
By ferry the island is just under four hours from Oban.
The ferries are regarded as a lifeline service.
Most people and goods arrive by ferry.

Oban - the point of departure for many of the Hebridean Islands including Coll and Tiree
Oban – the point of departure for many of the Hebridean Islands including Coll and Tiree

In the Hebrides
there is a close connection with the sea.
Consciously or unconsciously, we are dependent
upon the work of the Northern Lighthouse Board
whose principal concern is with safety –
the safety of the mariner at sea
and the safety of the people they employ
in or around some of the world’s most dangerous coastlines.

Lismore Lighthouse
Lismore Lighthouse

For those who like to be out on deck
you cannot fail to notice the various lighthouses
and the more observant become conscious of the various buoys.
These buoys are vital aids for the safe navigation of the waters around our coastline.
For example in the Sound of Mull
you’ll find the Inninmore Bay Buoy and New Rocks Buoy.

The Northern Lighthouse Board have two vessels.
They can often be seen at their base in Oban.
They are the Pharos and the Pole Star.

This afternoon NLV Pole Star passed through the Passage of Tiree.
She was sailing from Skerryvore Lighthouse to Bloody Bay, off Mull.
The photograph shows her just over six miles from Scarinish.

Pole Star 6 miles out to sea off Scarinish, Isle of Tiree
Pole Star 6 miles out to sea off Scarinish, Isle of Tiree

‘NLV POLE STAR was built in 2000
and incorporates the latest thinking in hydrographic survey,
navigational and buoy handling technologies.
Smaller than PHAROS, she has a shallower draught,
permitting access to otherwise inaccessible waters.’
Northern Lighthouse Board Vessel Services

Life on Tiree – grateful for all who work to give a safe passage.

Advertisements