An East Wind

An East wind did blow and brought with it a strong chill factor.
Nevertheless once again the day began bright and sunny.
Walking today was certainly invigorating!

In the strong easterly the ferry cants as it swings to berth alongside the pier
In the strong easterly the ferry cants as it swings to berth alongside the pier

With the east wind gusting to 38mph the ferry was operating to an amended timetable.
The arrival and departure at Tiree was as detailed in the Winter timetable.
However there was only one stop at the Island of Coll.
The ferry sailed directly back to Oban.

The MV Clansman heading directly for Oban
The MV Clansman heading directly for Oban

Sailing into the wind the MV Clansman created an impressive bow wave.
Those working on the pier handling the ropes had to contend with both wind and cold.
Winter ropes are not only chilled by the cold water they have to be heavy.
The ropes have to take the strain of the ferry and the power of both wind and wave.

The sky over the east end was blue.
The sky over the east end was blue.

This afternoon, rather late, we walked along the east end of Gott Bay.
The sky to the east was blue but to the west it was covered by clouds.
The contrast was quite stark.

Gott Bay looking west.
Gott Bay looking west.

Imagine!
We more or less had the beach to ourselves.
We only met one other person walking along the beach.
However overhead there was certainly plenty of activity.

Parking the car at Brock we walked towards the Island of Soa.
It was too late to attempt a crossing this afternoon.
As it was we were walking into the cold easterly.

Even moe geese - this time close to Soa
Even moe geese – this time close to Soa

The water in the Passage of Tiree looked cold.
White horses were prancing across the crest of the waves.
Every so often we were granted a view of Ben More on Mull.

The cold waters of the Passage of Tiree and Ben More - 20 miles distant.
The cold waters of the Passage of Tiree and Ben More – 20 miles distant.

Ben More is over 20 miles distant.
Closer to hand are the various townships.
To the west is Scarinish and to the East Ruaig and Milton.

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Tilley the turbine towering over Ruaig and Ruaig bay.
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Beyond Ruaig is Milton

As we made our way back across the sands the wind was at our back.
Thankfully the wind speed was 30mph less than last Monday.
It certainly made for an invigorating walk.

The cottages at Brock are almost on the beach.
They can only be just a few metres above sea-level
We headed back along the shore of Gott Bay – the Big Beach.
There was just time to cross over to Balephetrish beach and bay.

Balephetrish Bay
Balephetrish Bay

We were not disappointed.
The seals were swimming close in to shore.
There is no doubt about it – they are so inquisitive.

This is ‘Life on Tiree’ enjoying the east wind that did blow.

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